FAQs

Below are some of the most commonly asked questions received by our customer service representatives:

My pool light is not working

  • Check your circuit breaker and reset if necessary.
  • Check your G.F.C.I. (Ground Fault Circuit Interrupter) and reset if necessary.
  • If your pool light is tied into a remote system, test your batteries. Are the remote frequencies set properly?

 

My pool is losing water

Your swimming pool will experience normal water loss through the process of evaporation. The rate of evaporation varies throughout the USA but if you are suspecting a greater than normal loss:

  • Closely inspect the swimming pool interior shell for cracks and defects. If you identify a structural problem with your swimming pool, we recommend that you request an appointment with one of our skilled service technicians.
  • Check the flexible backwash hose for any water leakage. If water is leaking out of this hose, the "O" rings will need to be replaced inside the backwash valve.

 

What is the normal water pressure for my filter?

Each swimming pool system has different water pressure tolerances. Please refer to your original owner's equipment manual and/or startup instructions to identify the range of proper pressure for your swimming pool.

  • If you suspect that the pressure is too high, check and clean out all debris from baskets. In addition, check to see if all your equipment valves are set properly and backwash your filter for several minutes.
  • If you suspect that the pressure is too high, confirm that the pressure gauge reads zero when the equipment is off. If it does not fall back down to zero, you will need to replace the gauge.
  • If you suspect that the pressure is too low, check and clean out all debris from baskets. In addition, check to see if all your equipment valves are set properly.
  • If you suspect that the pressure is too low, check to see if the gauge reads zero when the equipment is off. If it does not fall back down to zero, you will need to replace the gauge.

 

How often should I lubricate my backwash valve "O" rings?

The standard push/pull backwash valve is a plunger type of valve commonly found in sand and DE filter systems. Inside the valve is a plunger with two o-rings. When the valve is put into the backwash position, the flow of water through the filter is reversed. After putting the valve into the backwash position, the water is pumped out through the backwash rather then being returned to the swimming pool. Typically, a hose is attached to the valve so the operator can direct the water flow away from the swimming pool.

Normally, there are four "O" rings in this type of valve. If these rings become damaged, worn or dried out, two things will occur. Unfiltered water may return to the swimming pool and/or the swimming pool will begin to lose water.

  • Cap "O" Ring (1) seals the removable cap to the valve body. This "O" ring requires light lubrication and should be cleaned and lubricated each time the cap is removed.
  • Shaft "O" Ring (1) is inside the cap and provides a seal where the plunger shaft goes through the cap. This "O" ring requires light lubrication. Apply a small amount of lubricant to the shaft immediately above and below the cap and then work the shaft up and down. This should be done once per month or when the shaft becomes difficult to move.
  • Piston "O" Rings (2) are on the pistons or discs of the plunger. These rings require heavier lubrication. TURN OFF YOUR FILTER PUMP. Remove the cap and pull the plunger all the way out. Check the two "O" rings to make sure they are not damaged. They should fit snugly on the pistons with no kinks or twists. Apply a pencil-sized bead of lubricant around each "O" ring and insert back into the plunger. Re-install the cap. This should be done once per month (or as necessary) when the shaft becomes difficult to move.

 

How often should I clean the grids on my D.E. (Diatomaceous earth filter)?

Most manufacturers recommend that the following procedure be done on an annual basis. Disassemble the filter, clean with garden hose, inspect the grids for tear and holes and re-coat new D.E.

This type of filter utilizes D.E. powder to strain debris from the water (as recommended by the manufacturer). D.E. is the fossilized remains of plankton (diatoms) that have been ground into a fine powder. The cloth-covered grids within the filter must be pre-coated with D.E. powder for the proper filter operation.

  • Pre-coat the filter grids by mixing a combination of D.E. and water. The slurry solution should have the consistency of watered down pancake batter. Slowly pour this slurry into the skimmer while the pump is running. Once the grids are coated, the debris will be removed from the swimming pool water. The water flows through the grids and flows out the end opening into the manifold and returned to the swimming pool.
  • Backwashing a D.E. filter is similar to the procedure for the sand filter. By reversing the flow of water, the debris and dirty D.E. are loosened from the grid. This water is washed out of the filter and into the backwash line. After this is completed, the D.E. re-coating of the grids can proceed.

D.E. powder is non-biodegradable and a separation tank may be installed on your backwash line to capture all of the flushed powder particles.

 

Contact Us
Pool Chemistry Checklist